News/Blog

Nonprofit leaders continue to face the ongoing challenges of fundraising in an increasingly competitive market. But the most recent “Nonprofit Leadership Impact Study” from NonProfitPRO shows that when NPOs have an intelligent strategy, things go much better. While the study covers leadership issues ranging from staffing to board management, many findings tie directly into marketing communications.

With the current supply chain crisis, some companies may wonder if they should pull back on their marketing. Should you drive demand when retail distribution can be inconsistent? What about access to paper for direct mail and other marketing projects? Specific grades can be challenging to find. Should you just pull back?

Did you know that people don’t read their direct mail randomly? There is a flow to where their eyes naturally go, and their eyes land on specific areas of the envelope or letter before others. These places are called “hot spots.” Once you know them, you can reap huge benefits by using that knowledge to maximize those spaces.

Anyone having success with email marketing knows that, at some point, certain customers “go dark” or stop responding to your offers. This doesn’t necessarily mean that they are no longer interested. Going dark can happen for any number of reasons, including an overflowing inbox. One proven win-back strategy is to re-engage them using oversized postcards.

Did you know that the United States Postal Service is giving you free multichannel exposure every day? You don’t need to do anything extra to receive this benefit, although there are some tricks you can use to make the most of it.

There are many channels that allow you to communicate with your customers. From direct mail to email and social media, the options have exploded. But not every customer prefers the same channels, and depending on the type of communication, customers might prefer different channels for each. Get the channel right, and you make it easy for customers to communicate and buy. Get it wrong, and customers can tune you out, even if yours is a product they want or need.